Getting My Shit Together

Jul 21

“She was the kind of girlfriend God gives you young, so you’ll know loss the rest of your life” — Junot Diaz, This Is How You Lose Her (via hoodniggashit)

(Source: dodson123, via therainssmallhands)

“I want all my secrets back” — six word story (via velvet-plats)

(via geminiofthetiger)

owlmylove:

when i find stretch marks on my thighs i make a point of smooching them because they’re just doing their best at keeping the all-powerful immortal Being within me from ripping my mortal shell asunder in a blaze of heavenly glory and eviscerating the cosmos in my divine wrath

(via beccaliving)


sin título by Lina Scheynius on Flickr.

sin título by Lina Scheynius on Flickr.

(Source: lookporn, via porn4ladies)

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Jul 17

(Source: sarahseeandersen, via brain-food)

Jun 21

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A few times I can identify exactly why my stomach sunk and the true trust disappeared.

A few times I can identify exactly why my stomach sunk and the true trust disappeared.

(Source: ladiesagainsthumanity)

(Source: ladiesagainsthumanity)

ladiesagainsthumanity:

This article, “Everyone is totally just winging it, all the time,” has been making the rounds on the internet this week. The article argues that when public figures make unforced errors, it’s nice to remember that they, like us, are just making shit up as they go along and winging it all the time. 
While it is nice to remember that all of us feel like little kids faking it in a grown-up world sometimes (see: me losing my shit as my blender spews things over my entire kitchen), I actually think this kind of thinking is symptomatic of a crisis in American business structure: the valuing of intangible skills such as “leadership” or “vision” over hard skills and expertise. People who are seen as smart enough to talk about work for a living get to run the show, while people who *do* work for a living are seen as executors rather than innovators. 
There are obvious examples where experts need to be in charge, examples with life and death consequences: we wouldn’t want someone lacking expertise in how to make airplanes not crash in charge of making airplanes not crash, right? But at the companies where most of us work, it’s blurrier who the real experts are and therefore easier to confuse willingness to fake being an expert with actually being one. 
This is in no small part connected to systemic sexism and racism in the workplace — most women and people of color assume that the way to prove yourself is to work twice as hard and produce twice as much, when in reality doing that often gets you pegged as a worker rather than a leader. 
Long story short, I don’t think everyone’s winging it all the time. I think a lot of people who wing it get more power and higher salaries than people who don’t, and that’s a problem.
Is this something you see in your workplace? Tag your stories #NotWingingIt and I’ll reblog. In conclusion, here’s a gif of how Kelly Kapowski feels about workplace misogyny:
 

ladiesagainsthumanity:

This article, “Everyone is totally just winging it, all the time,” has been making the rounds on the internet this week. The article argues that when public figures make unforced errors, it’s nice to remember that they, like us, are just making shit up as they go along and winging it all the time. 

While it is nice to remember that all of us feel like little kids faking it in a grown-up world sometimes (see: me losing my shit as my blender spews things over my entire kitchen), I actually think this kind of thinking is symptomatic of a crisis in American business structure: the valuing of intangible skills such as “leadership” or “vision” over hard skills and expertise. People who are seen as smart enough to talk about work for a living get to run the show, while people who *do* work for a living are seen as executors rather than innovators. 

There are obvious examples where experts need to be in charge, examples with life and death consequences: we wouldn’t want someone lacking expertise in how to make airplanes not crash in charge of making airplanes not crash, right? But at the companies where most of us work, it’s blurrier who the real experts are and therefore easier to confuse willingness to fake being an expert with actually being one. 

This is in no small part connected to systemic sexism and racism in the workplace — most women and people of color assume that the way to prove yourself is to work twice as hard and produce twice as much, when in reality doing that often gets you pegged as a worker rather than a leader. 

Long story short, I don’t think everyone’s winging it all the time. I think a lot of people who wing it get more power and higher salaries than people who don’t, and that’s a problem.

Is this something you see in your workplace? Tag your stories #NotWingingIt and I’ll reblog. In conclusion, here’s a gif of how Kelly Kapowski feels about workplace misogyny:

 

“It’s normal to lick the spoon. It’s also normal to not lick the spoon. But it’s disordered to not let yourself lick the spoon, when you really want to.” —

(via kirstyvstheworld)

This resonates with me in a manner you would not believe

(via therainssmallhands)

(Source: double--shot, via therainssmallhands)

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