"She was the kind of girlfriend God gives you young, so you’ll know loss the rest of your life"

— Junot Diaz, This Is How You Lose Her (via hoodniggashit)

(Source: dodson123, via therainssmallhands)

"I want all my secrets back"

— six word story (via velvet-plats)

(via geminiofthetiger)

owlmylove:

when i find stretch marks on my thighs i make a point of smooching them because they’re just doing their best at keeping the all-powerful immortal Being within me from ripping my mortal shell asunder in a blaze of heavenly glory and eviscerating the cosmos in my divine wrath

(via beccaliving)


sin título by Lina Scheynius on Flickr.

sin título by Lina Scheynius on Flickr.

(Source: lookporn, via porn4ladies)

coeur-de-porcelaine:

pansexualpagan:

kaylamariesmiley:

toenail-fister:

daigonite:

lucifers-lycan:

sizvideos:

Mila Kunis Against Men Saying “We Are Pregnant” - Video

What the fuck is this bullshit and why was it recommended for me?

It’s not like men are involved in the creation of the baby or anything.

I mean shit, I understand that pregnancy is an extremely strenuous thing on the woman, but that doesn’t mean that a dude can’t be proud of the fact that he’s going to be a father.

Hmm. Weird how someone would want to be considered a part of the pregnancy…
There goes all of my respect for Mila Kunis.

My goodness, women like this have some fucking nerve. Good luck Ashton.

Please stop.

Pregnancy is a very dangerous time for cis-women. Until cis-men are capable of nine months of pain without the ability to take painkillers, followed by hours of one of the most painful experiences a human can undergo, I agree with Mila Kunis. It is your child. Not your pregnancy. You don’t get a fucking medal for sticking your dick inside someone and impregnating them, you get a child. So no, you don’t need a fucking spotlight highlighting your months of work and pain and the fact that you can potentially die trying to bring life into the world when you have not undergone any of the physical effort.

Things you can expect during pregnancy: Anemia, urinary tract infections, constipation, mental health conditions including intense depression, hyperemesis gravidarm (basically when persistent vomiting is more than just morning sickness and requires hospitalization). Not to mention there are dozens of infections that can cause serious problems. (x) (x)

Oh and the fact that 20% of pregnancies end in miscarriages which obviously requires hospitalization for the pregnant woman and causes a lot of emotional trauma.

Or that you can’t consume alcohol, most types of fish, you can’t expose yourself to hot water (or any heat, really), or get an x-ray. You cannot eat lunch meats, raw sprouts (radishes, alfalfa, etc.), soft cheeses, anything unpasteurized is out, as are foods with raw or undercooked eggs. And caffeine can lead to miscarriages, so say goodbye to coffee, teas, and chocolate. (x) (x) (x)

About 2 million pregnancy losses occur annually in the U.S.; 6 million babies are born. 25% of pregnancies are lost.

14.5% of pregnant women will experience at least one pregnancy complication.

11% of women are diagnosed with post partum depression.

(x)

800 women die because of pregnancy-related problems in the U.S. annually. (x)

Labor can last for 36 hours or more. You’re in a room full of strangers, who are all seeing your vagina, your blood, your shit, your piss, and your agony. It’s common for tearing to occur during the delivery (x) and after the baby is born you still have to deliver the placenta (essentially an organ).

Pregnancy is terrifying, dangerous, and uncomfortable. None of you have the right to shit on Mila Kunis for telling the truth: You do not deserve the spotlight of your wife’s pregnancy. So get over yourselves. Yes, the father CAN be proud, and he should be. But it’s not his pregnancy. He is not the one who will endure it.

It is not weird that someone would want to be involved in their wife’s pregnancy. It is weird that you have the fucking nerve to lose respect for someone reminding you that the father is not the pregnant one in the picture.

So please, stop.

Today in male entitlement: now women ”have some nerve” if they remind men that they are not, in fact, the pregnant ones. 

(via therainssmallhands)

charleskinbote:

summer more like ugh (mer)

(via brain-food)

monicalewinsky1996:

chicagobowls:

Deafblind Brazilian “watches” World Cup with the help of his friends - Video

THESE are real friends. Absolutely amazing.

im crying this is so amazing and sweet

(Source: sizvideos, via beccaliving)

A few times I can identify exactly why my stomach sunk and the true trust disappeared.

A few times I can identify exactly why my stomach sunk and the true trust disappeared.

(Source: ladiesagainsthumanity)

ladiesagainsthumanity:

This article, “Everyone is totally just winging it, all the time,” has been making the rounds on the internet this week. The article argues that when public figures make unforced errors, it’s nice to remember that they, like us, are just making shit up as they go along and winging it all the time. 
While it is nice to remember that all of us feel like little kids faking it in a grown-up world sometimes (see: me losing my shit as my blender spews things over my entire kitchen), I actually think this kind of thinking is symptomatic of a crisis in American business structure: the valuing of intangible skills such as “leadership” or “vision” over hard skills and expertise. People who are seen as smart enough to talk about work for a living get to run the show, while people who *do* work for a living are seen as executors rather than innovators. 
There are obvious examples where experts need to be in charge, examples with life and death consequences: we wouldn’t want someone lacking expertise in how to make airplanes not crash in charge of making airplanes not crash, right? But at the companies where most of us work, it’s blurrier who the real experts are and therefore easier to confuse willingness to fake being an expert with actually being one. 
This is in no small part connected to systemic sexism and racism in the workplace — most women and people of color assume that the way to prove yourself is to work twice as hard and produce twice as much, when in reality doing that often gets you pegged as a worker rather than a leader. 
Long story short, I don’t think everyone’s winging it all the time. I think a lot of people who wing it get more power and higher salaries than people who don’t, and that’s a problem.
Is this something you see in your workplace? Tag your stories #NotWingingIt and I’ll reblog. In conclusion, here’s a gif of how Kelly Kapowski feels about workplace misogyny:
 

ladiesagainsthumanity:

This article, “Everyone is totally just winging it, all the time,” has been making the rounds on the internet this week. The article argues that when public figures make unforced errors, it’s nice to remember that they, like us, are just making shit up as they go along and winging it all the time. 

While it is nice to remember that all of us feel like little kids faking it in a grown-up world sometimes (see: me losing my shit as my blender spews things over my entire kitchen), I actually think this kind of thinking is symptomatic of a crisis in American business structure: the valuing of intangible skills such as “leadership” or “vision” over hard skills and expertise. People who are seen as smart enough to talk about work for a living get to run the show, while people who *do* work for a living are seen as executors rather than innovators. 

There are obvious examples where experts need to be in charge, examples with life and death consequences: we wouldn’t want someone lacking expertise in how to make airplanes not crash in charge of making airplanes not crash, right? But at the companies where most of us work, it’s blurrier who the real experts are and therefore easier to confuse willingness to fake being an expert with actually being one. 

This is in no small part connected to systemic sexism and racism in the workplace — most women and people of color assume that the way to prove yourself is to work twice as hard and produce twice as much, when in reality doing that often gets you pegged as a worker rather than a leader. 

Long story short, I don’t think everyone’s winging it all the time. I think a lot of people who wing it get more power and higher salaries than people who don’t, and that’s a problem.

Is this something you see in your workplace? Tag your stories #NotWingingIt and I’ll reblog. In conclusion, here’s a gif of how Kelly Kapowski feels about workplace misogyny:

 

"It’s normal to lick the spoon. It’s also normal to not lick the spoon. But it’s disordered to not let yourself lick the spoon, when you really want to."

(via kirstyvstheworld)

This resonates with me in a manner you would not believe

(via therainssmallhands)

(Source: double--shot, via therainssmallhands)